Chapter 6: The Gulf War Drugs

The current regulations do not permit a determination that obtaining informed consent is otherwise not feasible or is contrary to the best interest of the subject . . . II. DOD’s Request . . .FDA assistance is also needed on the issue of informed consent. Under...

Chapter 4: Judicial Remedies?

The bar created by Chappell – a judicial exception to an implied remedy for the violation of constitutional rights – surely cannot insulate defendants from liability for deliberate and calculated exposure of otherwise healthy military personnel to medical...

Chapter 3: The General Did What!?

“Hey D, you got a minute?” I looked up from behind my computer. I must have betrayed a look of impatience, because Justin looked back at me and said “What?” “I’m sorry, man. Sure, what’s on your mind?” I pushed back from my desk and he leaned against the wall, all...

Chapter 2: The Nuremberg Code

Members of the military are not shorn of their constitutional rights while they remain in the military service. Blackstone said: ‘. . . he puts not off the citizen when he enters the camp; but it is because he is a citizen, and would wish to continue so, that he makes...

Episode 4 – The Case Against Public Education

Preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance; establish and improve the law for educating the common people. Let our countrymen know that the people alone can protect us against these evils, and that the tax which will be paid for this purpose is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests and nobles who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance.

Episode 3: What Happened To Modern Science? aka How and When we got to Post-Modern Science

“The crucial event was that one which for almost two hundred years had been felt to be impossible, but which nevertheless took place near the start of this century: the fall of the Newtonian empire in physics. This catastrophe, and the period of extreme turbulence in physics which it inaugurated, changed the entire history of the philosophy of science. Almost all philosophers of the 18th and 19th centuries, it was now clear, had enormously exaggerated the certainty and extent of scientific knowledge.” ~David Stove, “Popper and After”